Search Results for: Barbara Crossette

Oct
21
2005

Miller's Tale

Can the reporter--or the New York Times--be trusted?

The New York Times editorial page told readers over and over again that Times reporter Judith Miller went to jail for 85 days for a noble cause--the protection of confidential sources. But to many outside observers, the principles that Miller went to jail for were far from clear, with many fundamental questions left unanswered. Readers and media watchers were eager to hear Miller's side of the story, and to see the newspaper devote its considerable journalistic energy to investigating a crucial political story that its reporter was in the middle of: the efforts of Bush administration officials to punish a […]

Nov
01
2002

A Scoop They'd Rather Forget

U.N. spying scandal goes from fact to allegation

Nothing makes a newspaper prouder than a juicy foreign policy scoop. Except, it seems, when the scoop ends up raising awkward questions about a U.S. admin­istration's drive for war. Back in 1999, major papers ran front-page investigative stories reveal­ing that the CIA had covertly used U.N. weapons inspectors, known as UN­SCOM, to spy on Iraq for the U.S.'s own intelligence purposes. "United States officials said today that American spies had worked undercover on teams of United Nations arms inspectors," the New York Times reported (1/7/99). According to the Washington Post (3/2/99), the U.S. "infiltrated agents and espionage equipment for three […]

Sep
24
2002

Spying in Iraq: From Fact to Allegation

Nothing makes a newspaper prouder than a juicy foreign-policy scoop. Except, it seems, when the scoop ends up raising awkward questions about a U.S. administration's drive for war. Back in 1999, major papers ran front-page investigative stories revealing that the CIA had covertly used U.N. weapons inspectors to spy on Iraq for the U.S.'s own intelligence purposes. "United States officials said today that American spies had worked undercover on teams of United Nations arms inspectors," the New York Times reported (1/7/99). According to the Washington Post (3/2/99), the U.S. "infiltrated agents and espionage equipment for three years into United Nations […]

Dec
01
2000

Muffled Coverage of U.N. Vote

Media ignore broad Mideast consensus

U.S. media have been ignoring or downplaying an important dimension of the ongoing turmoil in the Middle East. On October 7, the United Nations Security Council voted 14 to 0 for a resolution condemning Israel's "excessive use of force against Palestinians" and deploring the "provocation" of Israeli opposition leader Ariel Sharon's September 28 visit to the Temple Mount. The United States was the only Security Council member to abstain from the vote, which it did after trying to soften the language of the resolution. The outcome was generally interpreted as assigning most of the responsibility for the violence to Israel. […]

Oct
16
2000

Muffled Coverage of U.N. Vote

Media Ignores Broad Mideast Consensus

U.S. media have been ignoring or downplaying an important dimension of the ongoing turmoil in the Middle East. On October 7, the United Nations Security Council voted 14 to 0 for a resolution condemning Israel's "excessive use of force against Palestinians" and deploring the "provocation" of Israeli opposition leader Ariel Sharon's September 28 visit to the Temple Mount (see www.un.org/Docs/scres/2000/res1322e.pdf). The United States was the only Security Council member to abstain from the vote, which it did after trying to soften the language of the resolution. The outcome was generally interpreted as assigning most of the responsibility for the violence […]

Sep
13
2000

'Paper of Record' Distorts Record on Iraq Sanctions

On September 12, the New York Times ran a blatantly biased front-page article by U.N. correspondent Barbara Crossette about Iraq's decision not to allow two teams of United Nations experts into Iraq to assess the effects of the sanctions. This article is only the latest example of Crossette's alarming willingness to repeat increasingly shrill-- and largely discredited-- charges from the U.S. State Department that the Iraqi government is sabotaging the U.N.'s relief work. (See http://www.fair.org/index.php?page=1025.) Throughout the article, Crossette's reporting aims to give the impression that Iraq does not allow any outside experts to investigate humanitarian conditions inside the country. […]

Mar
01
2000

New York Times on Iraq Sanctions

A case of journalistic malpractice

In a 1998 article (4/23/98), New York Times United Nations correspondent Barbara Crossette critiqued the film Genocide by Sanctions, a documentary produced by a coalition of activist groups opposed to the U.N. sanctions on Iraq. Using footage of dying Iraqi children, the film sought to dramatize Iraq's desperate humanitarian conditions under the U.N. embargo; more than 1.25 million Iraqis have reportedly died from the massive escalation in the mortality rate since sanctions were imposed in 1990 (Reuters, 12/29/99). After noting that the coalition "produced a graphic videotape of dying children in Iraq, asserting that they were killed by sanctions," Crossette […]

Aug
26
1999

For the New York Times, Iraq Deaths Are the Other Guy's Fault

Journalism best serves the common good when it focuses attention on social problems that its audience can help to solve. But establishment media outlets like the New York Times are often far less interested in the ills caused by the U.S. government than they are in the sins of distant regimes--especially those that have been designated as official enemies. On August 23, U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan released his latest report on the Iraqi oil-for-food program, which allows Iraq to exchange a limited amount of oil in return for humanitarian supplies to alleviate the devastating effects of the U.N. sanctions on […]