Search Results for: J.F. Sargent

Jul
01
2014

Extra! July/August 2014

Extra! July 2014

Articles Available Only to Subscribers: SoundBites Who Gets to Speak on Cable News The identity of the whitest, malest show we found may surprise you by Peter Hart Spinning Away Israel 'Gaffes' Damage control for Christie and Kerry's inadvertent honesty by Alex Kane White, White Don't Tell Me NPR's bumbling attempts at diversity by Josmar Trujillo Study Confirms Our Wealth-Controlled Politics News suppressed by our wealth-controlled media by Steve Rendall and Janine Jackson It Will be Facebook's Virtual World Will we just live--and work-- in it? by J.F. Sargent

Oct
01
2013

Where the Girls Aren’t

Working overtime to keep female gamers invisible

Bioshock: Infinite cover

Videogame companies have chosen a target demographic (adolescent boys) and they’ll do whatever they have to to make them happy—even if that means pretending real women don’t exist.

May
01
2013

Comic Book Superheroes Face Their Greatest Challenge!

Stuggling to stay relevant in the 21st century

Sargent1

Despite the fact that you can’t turn on the TV without being reminded about the existence of superhero movies, the original medium for superhero stories —comic books—has been in significant decline over the past few years. They’ve tried to bring in new readers by diversifying their line-up: DC Comics rebooted everything with its “New 52!” while Marvel Comics created the parallel “Ultimate Universe” where the same characters face different, more “risky” situations in a completely separate, parallel universe.  This experimentation has led to some great, progressive storylines that have moved the medium forward, but it also highlights some big problems. […]

Nov
01
2012

Videogame Bigotry and the Illusion of Freedom

How game designers turn prejudice into play

Elder Scrolls: Skyrim's 'Redguard' race--Photo Credit: Skyrim Wiki/Bethesda Softworks/Google Images

The definitive element of a videogame is the player’s agency within the game’s world. Instead of “viewers,” games have “players," and the player makes dozens of choices every minute that directly shape the experience: Will Mario sneak around the turtle monster, or will he jump on it until it dies? That sense of control over the protagonist can give the narrative of a videogame much greater impact than that of any conventional form of storytelling.But with that agency comes an illusion of freedom--which is dangerous. The player is not really “free,” since their actions are limited to the options created […]