Search Results for: Rahul Mahajan

Apr
30
2004

Rahul Mahajan on Fallujah, Greg Nojeim on Bush & PATRIOT Act

Download MP3 The US campaign to win hearts and minds seems to have run into a snag in Fallujah, where the military attack and siege has cost hundreds of Iraqi civilians their lives. How important is the Fallujah story and how well has US journalism covered it? CounterSpin will talk to Journalist Rahul Mahajan of Empirenotes.org, he's just returned from Iraq where he spent some time in besieged Fallujah. Also this week: the Bush administration is making yet another attempt to sell the public on the Patriot Act. This time around it was George W. Bush himself doing the selling. […]

Jul
24
2007

NY Times Responds Again on Fallujah

Public editor's second response contains factual errors

To paraphrase Clark Hoyt, if you're going to defend the performance of a news organization, you at a minimum need to get your facts right. In his second response to FAIR regarding the New York Times' review of the play Fallujah, Hoyt wrote: In restating its case, it introduced a new error--calling white phosphorus (WP), the incendiary weapon that was used in Fallujah, a "chemical agent," which it is not. Chemical agents, like nerve gas, are something entirely different. While calling WP a chemical agent may add emotional punch to FAIR’s argument, it indicates to me a carelessness with terms […]

Jul
20
2007

NY Times Responds on Fallujah Weapons

Public editor sides with reporter's dismissal

(NOTE: Please see the further Activism Update regarding this alert.) On July 18, New York Times public editor Clark Hoyt responded to FAIR's June 11 Action Alert "Incendiary Weapons are No Allegation." FAIR's action alert took issue with a New York Times review (5/29/07) of the British play Fallujah, in which reviewer Jane Perlez called into question the "objectivity" and "authenticity" of the playwright, Jonathan Holmes, over "the scenes that deal with the use of napalm in Falluja, an allegation made by left-wing critics of the war but never substantiated." In his response, Hoyt stood by Perlez's criticism that alleged […]

Jun
21
2006

Their Barbarism, and Ours

The Baghdad bureau chief of the New York Times could not have been any clearer. “The story really takes us back into the 8th century, a truly barbaric world,” John Burns said. He was speaking June 20 on the PBS NewsHour With Jim Lehrer, describing what happened to two U.S. soldiers whose bodies had just been found. Evidently they were victims of atrocities, and no one should doubt in the slightest that the words of horror used by Burns to describe the “barbaric murders” were totally appropriate. The problem is that Burns and his mass-media colleagues don’t talk that way […]

Apr
15
2004

CNN to Al Jazeera: Why Report Civilian Deaths?

As the casualties mount in the besieged Iraqi city of Fallujah, Qatar-based Al Jazeera has been one of the only news networks broadcasting from the inside, relaying images of destruction and civilian victims-- including women and children. But when CNN anchor Daryn Kagan interviewed the network's editor-in-chief, Ahmed Al-Sheik, on Monday (4/12/04)-- a rare opportunity to get independent information about events in Fallujah-- she used the occasion to badger Al-Sheik about whether the civilian deaths were really "the story" in Fallujah. Al Jazeera has recently come under sharp criticism from U.S. officials, who claim the Iraqi casualties are 95 percent […]

Nov
01
2001

'We Think the Price Is Worth It'

Media uncurious about Iraq policy's effects--there or here

Madeleine Albright speaking to students at Georgia Southern University/Photo: Georgia Southern University

Lesley Stahl on U.S. sanctions against Iraq: We have heard that a half million children have died. I mean, that's more children than died in Hiroshima. And, you know, is the price worth it? Secretary of State Madeleine Albright: I think this is a very hard choice, but the price--we think the price is worth it. --60 Minutes (5/12/96) Then-Secretary of State Madeleine Albright's quote, calmly asserting that U.S. policy objectives were worth the sacrifice of half a million Arab children, has been much quoted in the Arabic press. It's also been cited in the United States in alternative commentary […]