Search Results for: Robin Andersen

Dec
29
2006

Robin Andersen on media and war

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Download MP3 This week on CounterSpin: A special conversation with media historian and scholar Robin Andersen about the media and war. Andersen's new book A Century of Media, A Century of War traces media gullibility, official deception and propaganda through the years. It's a reminder that the media's role in making the case for the Iraq War is part of a larger story, that of a press corps that regularly cheers on American military action while shielding readers and viewers from its consequences. We'll speak about that history, and how military imagery in the culture at large affects how we […]

Sep
06
2013

Extra! September 2013

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SoundBites Race Focus Profiling the Protesters Right-wing media predict violence after Zimmerman verdict by Josmar Trujillo CounterSpin Interview ‘This Is a Problem That Goes Back 150 Years’ Robin D. G. Kelley on the Zimmerman trial Anti-Choice Fight Flies Under Media Radar Without a dramatic storyline, little national attention by Sara McCloskey Aaron Sorkin’s Newsroom A deeply flawed yet riveting lament for the news by Robin Andersen

Jul
01
2011

Fiction More Real Than What's 'Fit to Print'

HBO’s Treme covers New Orleans’ recovery

A timeline of the horrific events that unfolded in the wake of Hurricane Katrina hangs on the wall of the conference room in the Treme production offices in New Orleans. The skeletal framework is fleshed out by a team of writers, many of them locals, determined to bring to life the story of people who doggedly reinhabit New Orleans as a place, a state of mind and a culture that refuses to die. Though Treme is scripted entertainment by David Simon and Eric Overmyer, producers of HBO’s The Wire, the events and characters—especially the musicians—are drawn from the cultural traditions, […]

Mar
01
2009

Tom Ricks' Gamble

Justifying a kinder, gentler Iraq occupation

Photo Credit: Thomas Ricks/Penguin Books

Reporter Thomas Ricks’ new book The Gamble: General David Petraeus and the American Military Adventure in Iraq, 2006-2008, documents the military changes that took place in Iraq after the controversial troop “surge,” which is commonly credited with having greatly reduced violence in the country (Extra!, 11-12/07, 9-10/08). A Pentagon correspondent for the Washington Post, Ricks is also a senior fellow at the Center for a New American Security and writes the Best Defense blog at Foreign Policy.com. Ricks has been deeply embedded with the leadership of the “surge” and, as the book boasts, had “extraordinary privileged access” to Petraeus and […]

Jan
01
2008

Hollywood's Media--and Washington's

Rendition highlights the limits of torture discussion

“Guantánamo, a prison in no way ready to close, is at the heart of a conversation that almost no one seems willing to open.” Since September 27, 2007, when Karen Greenberg closed an article on TomDispatch.com with that observation, a media conversation about torture has unexpectedly taken off. The New York Times (10/4/07) published a lengthy exposé about the long turmoil at the Department of Justice caused by the Bush White House’s insistence that “enhanced interrogation” was key to fighting its “war on terror.” PBS’s Frontline (10/16/07) explored how Dick Cheney's office secretly pushed the idea that the president could […]

Jan
01
2007

BOOK EXCERPT: Invading Grenada

Selling the modern era’s first ‘pre-emptive’ war

“It isn’t nutmeg that’s at stake in the Caribbean and Central America; it is the United States’ national security.” —President Ronald Reagan, March 10, 1983 On October 23, 1983, U.S. combat troops began Operation Urgent Fury in the eastern Caribbean, invading the sovereign state of Grenada, an island of 113 square miles with approximately 110,000 inhabitants. It was the first time the U.S. military had committed combat troops since Vietnam. Over the course of a year, the Reagan administration had argued vigorously that Grenada posed a threat to U.S. national security. Unlike the unlimited access journalists had in Vietnam, the […]

Oct
01
2006

Memory Unerased

Deep Dish documents the unseen Iraq War

In the days before the 2003 invasion of Iraq, as the U.S. military planned a massive aerial bombing campaign on the densely populated city of Baghdad, the Pentagon phrase “Shock and Awe” was repeated with enthusiasm on television, part of the celebration of the power of modern warfare. At the same time, Deep Dish TV was setting in motion a plan to record, illuminate, document and bear witness to what would be left out of the commercial media war frame. They would title the 13-part series of 28-minute programs Shocking and Awful, and the group of independent artists and media […]

Dec
05
2002

A Call for Media Democracy

FCC Ready to Roll Back Limits on Media Consolidation

A range of media scholars and public interest, media and community groups from across the country have joined FAIR in issuing a Call for Media Democracy in response to the FCC's current "review" of the rules that govern big media. FAIR encourages everyone concerned with this issue to act now. Some suggestions of how you can take action to strengthen media diversity are included below. A Call for Media Democracy As the country reels from some of the biggest business scandals in U.S. history, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) is getting ready to give big media a big gift-- the […]