Search Results for: Steve Cobble

Jan
08
2004

Dixie Trap For Democrats In Presidential Race

Many pundits say President Bush is sitting pretty, but this year began with new poll data telling a very different story. A national Harris survey, completed on Jan. 1 for Time magazine and CNN, found that just 51 percent of respondents said they were “likely” to vote for Bush in November, compared to 46 percent “unlikely.” When people were asked to “choose between Howard Dean, the Democrat, and George W. Bush, the Republican,” the margin for Bush was only 51-43, and when the survey focused on “likely voters” the gap narrowed to 51-46. While other polls have some different numbers, […]

Apr
12
2000

The Appleseed Citizens' Task Force On Fair Debates

A blueprint for fair and open presidential debates in 2000

I. Introduction The Appleseed Citizens' Task Force on Fair Debates is a project of the Appleseed Electoral Reform Project at American University Washington College of Law. The Appleseed Project addresses the rising dominance of private wealth and corporate soft money in our elections and the corresponding decline in the quantity and quality of political participation by citizens. The Project engages in advocacy and scholarship on a broad range of electoral reform issues. Launched in 1999 by the Appleseed Foundation, a national non-profit public interest law organization, the Task Force is an independent and non-partisan group of distinguished citizens that has […]

Mar
27
1992

Counterspin No. 4: March 27, 1992

A Memo on Campaign Coverage From FAIR

KISSED BY THE GODS: There’s more than a little truth to Garry Trudeau’s satirical portrayal in “Doonesbury” of a reporter who can’t keep himself from writing that Gov. Bill Clinton has been “kissed by the gods.” Strangely, the media’s admiration for Clinton is combined with a conviction that it has somehow done him wrong. A Christian Science Monitor election piece (3/23) wrapped up with the observation that “the press,” along with Jerry Brown and the Washington political community, “may be judging Clinton too harshly.” Quoting a Brookings Institution analyst, the paper noted, “As the primaries have shown, ‘The country likes […]

Mar
20
1992

Counterspin No. 3: March 20, 1992

A Memo on Campaign Coverage From FAIR

BROWN OUT: Most of the press still feels a responsibility to steer the nomination toward candidates it considers acceptable. Time magazine’s much-hyped “Clinton vs. Tsongas” cover--out of date before its March 23 cover date--was yet another attempt to write Jerry Brown out of the race. If ignoring Brown doesn’t work, ridicule might: That same issue of Time called him “Samuel Gompers in Earth shoes,” a “walking Experiment in Living” with “terminal flightiness” and “deeply flawed” policy proposals. The corresponding issue of Newsweek used the word “pander” three times to refer to the “mad monk of presidential politics” and “masterful annoyance.” […]

Mar
13
1992

Counterspin No. 2: March 13, 1992

A Memo on Campaign Coverage from FAIR

GET ME REWRITE: In an early edition of the March 12 New York Times, an R.W. Apple article speculated about Pat Buchanan’s chances in Michigan: “He might also find support in Macomb County, north of Detroit, to which many white workers fled when their neighborhoods were taken over by blacks.” By the late edition, the race-baiting terminology had been removed: Macomb was now where “many white workers moved when blacks began to settle in their neighborhoods.” Apple deserves a Spin Doctor degree for writing (3/11) that “in some ways, Florida was a demographically ideal state for Mr. Tsongas.” Is a […]

Mar
06
1992

Counterspin No. 1: March 6, 1992

A Memo From FAIR on Campaign Coverage

THE NEW MATH: Sometimes journalists have problems with arithmetic--like the New York Times reporter (2/28/92) who noted that Bob Kerry had 8 percent in a poll and Jerry Brown “ranked next with 9 percent.” More serious problems with arithmetic were apparent in the coverage of “Junior Tuesday.” On a day with six contests that produced four winners, the “Democratic presidential campaign moved decisively toward a two-man struggle,” according to a New York Times lead (3/4/92) that reflected the conventional media wisdom on the race. (USA Today, however, tagged the campaign “a muddle,” bemoaning the fact that voters hadn’t made up […]