Mar
04
2013

Keystone's Endorsement by a TV 'Leftist'

carville-keystone

The controversy over the Keystone XL pipeline doesn't get covered much in corporate television–it takes tens of thousands of activists marching in Washington to get a few words on the nightly newscasts. But the State Department's recent draft assessment of the pipeline's environmental impact got a mention on one show, and it said a lot. Not about the pipeline, really, but about corporate media. The comment came on the roundtable discussion on ABC's This Week (3/3/13). The panel, like so many of these discussions, was tilted to the right: A Republican mayor from Utah (Mia Love), a former Bush adviser […]

Feb
20
2013

Why Does a Climatologist Need to Explain Economics to Joe Nocera?

NASA climatologist James Hansen has tried to explain to New York Times columnist Joe Nocera why he's so wrong about the tar sands, but Nocera's account of their argument makes it seem like explaining anything to him would be an uphill battle.

Feb
19
2013

Friendly Oil–Not the Venezuelan Kind

Exhibition-on-the-tar-san-005

With the Keystone climate protests in Washington bringing climate change back into the media, we're hearing a lot about how the Keystone pipeline will, at the very least, mean that we'll be getting our oil from a nice country.

Feb
15
2013

FAIR TV: Minimum Wage, SOTU Punditry, Dorner Denial

This week on FAIR TV: Why is raising the minimum wage considered "divisive"? And a Washington Post pundit gives Obama State of the Union advice: Skip climate change and go big on the deficit. Plus a look at the way the New York Times framed police brutality in a story about Charles Dorner. Remember: If you like what you see, share it on Facebook and Twitter, and subscribe to FAIR's YouTube feed.  

Feb
11
2013

A Beltway Villager's Bad Advice for Obama

220px-Chris_Cillizza_2012_05

The Washington Post's Chris Cillizza wrote a piece giving Barack Obama some advice on what to say in his State of the Union address. The article almost reads like a parody of Beltway punditry.

Jan
18
2013

NYT Leaves Readers High and Dry on Causes of Mississippi Drought

New York Times graphic on Mississippi River drought.

Nowhere in the New York Times' discussion of the reaction to what an accompanying graphic calls the "historic drought in 2012" is there any mention of what is changing our history: the climate change caused by global warming brought on by human alteration of Earth's atmosphere.

Jan
15
2013

Ignoring Climate Change When It Stares You in the Face

Roses in bloom in January in New York City's Union Square.

NBC Nightly News asked a serious question the other night–and then gave a not-so-serious answer: Why it is so cold where it should be warm, and so warm where it should be cold? What is going on with all this extreme weather?" Its answer was true as far as it went–but it didn't go any farther.

Dec
18
2012

Fracking: Too Much of a Good Thing, Says Planet Money Guy

Photo:Flickr/joshlopezphoto

There is no serious discussion of environmental costs borne by the public, and there is not one word about climate change–a pretty shocking oversight when one considers the potential ramifications of a massive new investment in a fossil fuel industry.

Nov
09
2012

FAIR TV: Obama's 'Non-Mandate,' Final Factchecking Fail, Climate Science

This week on FAIR TV: How does Obama's "non-mandate" compare to Bush's 2004 "mandate"? Does corporate media factchecking need a reality check? And we look at how superstorm Sandy failed to generate talk about climate change on the Sunday shows. Please watch it–and share it with your friends.<!–preview-break–>

Nov
06
2012

Yes, You Can Talk About Climate Change on TV

hayes-sandy

FAIR's new alert takes aim at the Sunday morning chat shows (Meet the Press, This Week, Face the Nation and Fox News Sunday) for ignoring climate change this weekend– right after "superstorm" Sandy devastated the East Coast. As we noted, NBC host David Gregory said early on his program: "Should more attention be paid to a changing climate's impact on the severity of these storms?" That was the last mention of climate change on the show. I know a lot of people might say, "Well, with the election around the corner, politics shows have to stick to electoral politics." I […]

Nov
05
2012

Worst Media Moment on Hurricane Sandy?

CNN's Erin Burnett (screengrab by mroach)

CNN reporter Erin Burnett's comment (10/29/12) that it was "kind of neat" to see New York City break its flooding record as the storm surge from Hurricane Sandy flooded Battery Park was bizarre, to say the very least: I just want to give everyone an update of where we are right now in terms of the record books. This is one for the record books. In terms of the storm surge here in Manhattan, Lower Manhattan where I am right now, almost a three-foot record, three feet. We're at 12.75 feet, as you can see, it's above my ankles now […]

Nov
04
2012

Media Should Describe Sandy as the Result of Our Climate Experiment

NASA Satellites See Sandy Expand as Storm Intensifies

Columbia Journalism Review's Curtis Brainard and I had a somewhat lengthy back-and-forth on Twitter about his view (10/30/12, 11/1/12) that some journalists and environmental activists are misleading the public by pointing to superstorm Sandy as an outcome of human-caused global warming. I argued on FAIR Blog (11/1/12) that saying that global warming caused Sandy is simply accurate–and later tried to make my point via tongue-in-cheek metaphor in a tweet. I don't think I convinced Brainard–"Wow. You're spinning words like tops," pretty much summed up his reaction. But I thought I'd try to explain what I was saying in a medium […]

Nov
01
2012

How'd You Like That Hurricane We Made?

Hurricane Sandy (NASA)

Writing about journalistic treatment of the superstorm and climate change, CJR's Curtis Brainard (10/30/12) criticizes the New Yorker's Elizabeth Kolbert for the wrong reason. He takes issue with her statement (10/29/12): As with any particular "weather-related loss event," it's impossible to attribute Sandy to climate change. However, it is possible to say that the storm fits the general pattern in North America, and indeed around the world, toward more extreme weather, a pattern that, increasingly, can be attributed to climate change. He's unhappy with the second part–retorting that you can't attribute a trend toward extreme weather to climate change. But […]