Mar
14
2014

Miguel Tinker Salas on Venezuela, Ali Abunimah on Palestine

CNN-Venezuela

This week on CounterSpin: Venezuela's violent demonstrations, which began a month ago, have begun to wind down. Has anything been resolved between the largely middle and upper class opposition, and the democratically elected government they want to leave? We'll talk with Pomona College professor and the author of The Enduring Legacy: Oil, Culture and Society in Venezuela, Miguel Tinker Salas.

Also this week: The news from Israel-Palestine is usually quite bleak, and this week is no different. But are the Palestinians winning? That's what Ali Abunimah argues in his new book The Battle for Justice in Palestine. He'll join us to explain.

Mar
07
2014

Robert Parry on Ukraine, Luke Charles Harris on My Brother's Keeper

CBS-putin

Journalists and pundits say Vladimir Putin is off his rocker, and the proof is his invasion of Crimea, and his crazy suggestion that the US has, on several occasions, acted lawlessly. We'll talk with Robert Parry of Consortium News, about the US, Russia and the power struggle over Ukraine.

Also on the show: Barack Obama announces a new initiative with the goal of improving opportunities for black and Latino boys and men, with a big emphasis on the role of fathers. For many media, the only question seems to be 'why'd he wait so long?' But there are deeper questions to consider about the effort called My Brother's Keeper. We'll hear from Luke Charles Harris of Vassar College about that.

Feb
28
2014

Shannon Young on 'Mexican Moment,' Ashley Gorski on NYPD Muslim Spying

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Glowing US coverage of Mexico's President Enrique Pena Nieto has some folks buzzing about the "Mexican Moment." But is privatizing the oil industry really the reform it's made out to be? We'll talk it over with independent journalist Shannon Young.

Also on the show: The Associated Press won a Pulitzer for reporting that the New York Police Department was spying on Muslims, in mosques, bookstores, restaurants and elsewhere, simply because they're Muslim. Now a federal judge has dismissed a lawsuit over that spying, saying any harm wasn't caused by the NYPD but by AP! We'll talk to Ashley Gorski of the ACLU about what the ruling means for civil liberties – and journalism.

Feb
21
2014

Lori Wallach on TPP, Gareth Porter on Iran

TPP-pubcitizen

This week on CounterSpin: Lori Wallach of Public Citizen's Global Trade Watch talks about the TPP, the sprawling commercial treaty the White House doesn't want you to know about. And Gareth Porter explains that most of what you read about Iran's nuclear program just isn't true.

Feb
14
2014

Sue Sturgis on Moral March, Toni Gilpin on Skills Gap Myth

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This week on CounterSpin: Tens of thousands of moral marchers descend on Raleigh North Carolina, the latest and most dramatic example of a social justice movement sweeping the state. The national press is mostly skipping the story; Sue Sturgis from the Institute for Southern Studies fills us in on what's happening.

Also on the show: You may have heard that the reason we have so many unemployed people isn't because there are no jobs, but because people don't have the right skills for the jobs that are open, in part because of our failing schools. If it doesn't sound right to you, that's because it's wrong. So why say it? We'll talk with labor historian and educator Toni Gilpin about the popular myth of the "skills gap."

Feb
07
2014

Joel Berg on Food Stamps, Jules Boykoff on Olympics

SNAP

This week on CounterSpin: Congress passed the nearly trillion dollar farm bill on Feb. 2nd—with more than $8 billion in cuts to food stamps, or the SNAP program as it is now known. What does this mean for people dealing with food insecurity, and where did the rest of the money go? We’ll talk to Joel Berg, the director of the New York City Coalition Against Hunger.

Also on the show: When the Olympics begin in Sochi, US viewers are likely to hear at least a little about Russia's crackdown on LGBT people and protests against it. If so it will be a rare instance of media acknowledging that politics are part of the Olympics story and not a detraction from it. We'll talk about Olympic activism with author and political science professor Jules Boykoff.

Jan
31
2014

John Schmitt on State of the Union, Dominique Apollon on Race & the Media

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The president's State of the Union address was met with praise from liberal pundits and derision from conservatives, with precious little analysis of the content. Was it a turn real toward populism? We'll take a look at some of Obama's economic talking points with John Schmitt, a senior economist with the Center for Economic and Policy Research.

Also on CounterSpin today, a new study of media coverage of race finds very little of it is what the researchers call 'systemically aware.' We'll ask Dominique Apollon from the group Race Forward to explain what that means, and what better coverage would look like.

Jan
24
2014

Alfred McCoy on the NSA and History of Political Surveillance

FILE PHOTO  NSA Compiles Massive Database Of Private Phone Calls

This week on CounterSpin: An independent review board has concluded that the National Security Agency's surveillance program poses threats to citizens' civil liberties, isn't really working to catch terrorists and should be ended. But while much debate centers on the data collected being mis-used, what about what happens if it's used as intended? We'll talk with Alfred McCoy, professor of history at the University of Wisconsin-Madison about the history of spying by the US government-- and the actual reasons they do it.