Jun
01
2014

Beyond ‘Boring Hand-Wringing’ on Newsroom Diversity

Changing the institutions that make journalism so white and male

Newsroom (cc photo: David Sim)

What needs to happen in order to never have a conversation about race and gender diversity in newsrooms ever again?

May
30
2014

Priyamvada Gopal on Indian Elections, Soraya Chemaly on Trigger Warnings

CNN-india

India's new prime minister Narendra Modi is being well-received in the US press, with his neoliberal economic ideas in the foreground and his ties to Hindu extremism pushed further back, or glossed. We'll speak to University of Cambridge professor Priyamvada Gopal about Modi.

Also this week: 'Trigger warnings' are, according to various media think pieces and op-eds, a new attack on free speech on college campuses, an attempt to protect the delicate sensibilities of young people who refuse to be challenged or have their beliefs questioned. But many argue that alerting people that they may encounter traumatic content isn't about punishing free speech, but actually about expanding conversations about things like racism and violence. We'll talk it over with feminist writer Soraya Chemaly.

May
02
2014

Craig Aaron on Net Neutrality, Anand Gopal on Afghan War

internet-freedom_5

Is the future of the open internet in danger? We'll talk to Craig Aaron of Free Press about what the FCC might be doing on net neutrality—and what the public can do to stop it.
Also this week: The Afghanistan War has a hidden history, well known to Afghans, but obscure to US media consumers. Without it, it's hard to understand why, when US foes vanished from the battle-field in 2002, the war continued, becoming America's longest. In his new book, No Good Men Among the Living; America, the Taliban, and the War through Afghan Eyes, journalist Anand Gopal looks at that hidden history-- he'll join us to talk about it.

May
01
2014

‘Radioactive’ Putin Is ‘Stalin’s Spawn’

With Official Enemies, too much is not enough

PutinSlider

Russian President Vladimir Putin’s invasion of the Crimean region of Ukraine meant that he was either “taking a page out of the Hitler playbook" or was “Stalin’s spawn.”

May
01
2014

Media Still Fawn Over Paul Ryan’s ‘Big Ideas’

But proposals to put people back to work are met with yawns

Paul Ryan at CPAC

Perhaps media aren’t driven to challenge Ryan’s bona fides as a “big-ideas guy” because they share those big ideas.

Apr
25
2014

Rafael Correa on Communications Law, Laila Al-Arian on Bangladesh

Rafael Correa

A new communications law in Ecuador seeks to break up powerful media conglomerates, create new community and public media and promote diversity on the airwaves. To US critics, though, it's really a way for left-leaning president Rafael Correa to silence his detractors. He'll join us to talk about the law and the press in his country.

Also on CounterSpin today, top: At the first anniversary of the Rana Plaza garment factory collapse in Bangladesh, a new film challenges US corporations' accountability for workplace conditions at suppliers they always seem to claim not to know. 'Made in Bangladesh,” from Al Jazeera America's Fault Lines series, recently won a Peabody Award. We'll speak with its producer, author and journalist Laila Al-Arian of Al Jazeera English.

Apr
24
2014

TPP TV Blackout

A big controversy that isn't news--but look what is...

The TV networks don't think the controversial Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal is newsworthy. But look at what they do think is worth covering....

Apr
18
2014

Adam Gaffney on Obamacare Costs; Astra Taylor on 'The People's Platform'

obamacare-signups

This week on CounterSpin: It's an understatement to say that media characterizations of the Affordable Care Act vary wildly. But so much analysis is devoted to political football, when health insurance is an issue calling out for news people can use. We'll talk about coverage with Adam Gaffney, a physician and writer at theprogressivephysician.org.

Also on the show: It wasn't that long ago that many people believed the Internet would be a kind of utopia; today many still hold that if only everyone had a way to get on line, it could be a truly democratic town square. A new book interrogates that idea, and shows how in many ways the net is anything but revolutionary. It's called The People's Platform: Taking Back Power and Culture in the Digital Age. We'll speak with author Astra Taylor.