May
29
2014

CNN's Climate Expert: Ann Coulter?!

Tell CNN that climate coverage should be reality-based

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What's worse than not covering climate change? How about a one-on-one interview with far right climate change denier Ann Coulter. CNN, you can do better than that.

May
23
2014

Nikole Hannah-Jones on School Segregation, Lizbeth Gronlund on US Nukes

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This week on CounterSpin: Much of the media coverage of the 60th anniversary of the Brown vs. Board of Education decision outlawing segregated schools noted an ominous development: American schools are still segregated, some even more so than before Brown. We'll talk to Nikole Hannah-Jones of ProPublica, who has been tracking this for a series called "Segregation Now."

Also this week: Congress is currently debating the military budget, including White House proposals to increase spending on nuclear weapons to 300 billion dollars over the next decade. But besides the rare wire story, you wouldn't know about it, despite news angles which might question how it conflicts with US international obligations and previous White House pronouncements. We'll speak with Lizbeth Gronlund of the Union of Concerned Scientists Global Security Program about nuclear weapons spending.

May
16
2014

Bronwyn Bruton on Nigeria, Ben Lilliston on Trade Policy & Climate

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This week on the show: The Bring Back Our Girls social media activism is an understandable response to the horrific kidnapping of hundreds of Nigerian school girls by the Boko Harum militant group. The story, ignored at first by the US press, is receiving wall to wall attention. We'll talk to Bronwyn Bruton of the Atlantic Council about some of the complexity often missing from that coverage.

Also this week: Some folks thought it odd that Barack Obama chose a Walmart as the place to declare his commitment to clean energy – the behemoth company is known, by many, for its record of climate pollution on a scale a few solar panels won't fix. But our guest says White House policies promoting energy efficiency and renewables face another formidable obstacle: namely, other White House policies. Ben Lilliston from the Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy will join us to explain.

May
09
2014

Dahlia Lithwick on Clayton Lockett, David Sirota on Journalists' Survey

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Dahlia Lithwick discusses the Oklahoma execution case that has been making international headlines, and David Sirota talks about what a new survey tells us about the state of journalism.

May
02
2014

Craig Aaron on Net Neutrality, Anand Gopal on Afghan War

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Is the future of the open internet in danger? We'll talk to Craig Aaron of Free Press about what the FCC might be doing on net neutrality—and what the public can do to stop it.
Also this week: The Afghanistan War has a hidden history, well known to Afghans, but obscure to US media consumers. Without it, it's hard to understand why, when US foes vanished from the battle-field in 2002, the war continued, becoming America's longest. In his new book, No Good Men Among the Living; America, the Taliban, and the War through Afghan Eyes, journalist Anand Gopal looks at that hidden history-- he'll join us to talk about it.

May
01
2014

‘Radioactive’ Putin Is ‘Stalin’s Spawn’

With Official Enemies, too much is not enough

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Russian President Vladimir Putin’s invasion of the Crimean region of Ukraine meant that he was either “taking a page out of the Hitler playbook" or was “Stalin’s spawn.”

May
01
2014

Media Still Fawn Over Paul Ryan’s ‘Big Ideas’

But proposals to put people back to work are met with yawns

Paul Ryan at CPAC

Perhaps media aren’t driven to challenge Ryan’s bona fides as a “big-ideas guy” because they share those big ideas.

Apr
25
2014

Rafael Correa on Communications Law, Laila Al-Arian on Bangladesh

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A new communications law in Ecuador seeks to break up powerful media conglomerates, create new community and public media and promote diversity on the airwaves. To US critics, though, it's really a way for left-leaning president Rafael Correa to silence his detractors. He'll join us to talk about the law and the press in his country.

Also on CounterSpin today, top: At the first anniversary of the Rana Plaza garment factory collapse in Bangladesh, a new film challenges US corporations' accountability for workplace conditions at suppliers they always seem to claim not to know. 'Made in Bangladesh,” from Al Jazeera America's Fault Lines series, recently won a Peabody Award. We'll speak with its producer, author and journalist Laila Al-Arian of Al Jazeera English.