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Oct
08
2014

Public TV: Where the One Percent Rule

Corporate sector overwhelmingly dominates public TV governing boards

A recent essay in Harper's (10/14) roiled the waters at PBS by arguing that public television is too often geared towards serving the "aging upper class: their tastes, their pet agendas, their centrist politics." Perhaps that's no surprise. A new FAIR study finds that the trustees of major public television stations are overwhelmingly drawn from the corporate sector. Out of 182 trustees surveyed on five station boards, 152--or 84 percent--have corporate backgrounds. Among these corporate-affiliated members, 138 are executives at elite businesses, while another 14 appear to be trustees because of their families' corporate-derived wealth. Seventy-five of the corporate-affiliated trustees […]

Oct
03
2014

Murtaza Hussain on Khorasan Group, Vijay Prashad on Narendra Modi

khorasan-cspin

This week on CounterSpin: When the US military attacks on Syria got underway, there was a sudden shift in the coverage: We weren't just bombing the Islamic State, but something called the Khorasan Group. But who are they and how come no one had ever heard of them before? We'll talk to reporter Murtaza Hussain of the Intercept about that.

Also this week: Indian prime minister Narendra Modi received a royal welcome when he arrived in the US for a visit on September 26. For a republic, it's always been a little strange how the US treats foreign heads of states like royalty, but with his controversial past and politics, Modi's treatment was even more curious than most. We'll talk with Trinity College history professor Vijay Prashad about Modi's American reception.

Oct
01
2014

#FTP Film Tha Police

Communities of color use media to protect themselves

Police officer Darren Wilson arresting a citizen for filming him.

Communities of color are learning to rely on themselves to report on what happens around them--and to them--by recording images of police activity.

Oct
01
2014

'The Black Voice Is in Jeopardy'

Malkia Cyril on Ferguson

Malkia Cyril, Center for Media Justice, Ferguson

The Internet—as a platform, as a vehicle for voice in black communities—has become one of the most powerful ways to bypass the exclusionary and discriminatory mainstream media.

Oct
01
2014

Extra! October 2014

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Articles Available Only to Subscribers:   SoundBites Race Lens #FTP Film Tha Police Communities of color use media to protect themselves by Josmar Trujillo CounterSpin Interview 'The Black Voice is in Jeopardy' Malkia Cyril on Ferguson Both Sides Now Plans to ease poverty don't have to work--so long as they're bipartisan by Neil deMause NYT  Fails First Test of New Torture Policy Paper says it will call it what it is--when it reports on it all by Peter Hart Official Sources May be the Only Sources Risen case tests reporters' power to reveal government wrongdoing by Lauren McCauley   To […]

Oct
01
2014

Who Rules Public TV?

Corporate sector overwhelmingly dominates public TV governing boards

David Koch, PBS

The corporate and financial sectors have an overwhelming presence on the governing boards of major public television stations.

Oct
01
2014

Michael Brown Had a Father

But will Ferguson shift media ideas on ‘fixing’ black men?

Ferguson police, protest

Corporate reporters, in the main, saw little to question the idea that the fundamental problem facing men of color is “broken” families in need of a dominant male and that entrenched socio-economic disparities could be meaningfully addressed without systemic change.

Sep
26
2014

Laurie Garrett on Ebola Crisis, Anne Petermann on Climate March

abc-ebola-2

This week on CounterSpin: The current outbreak of the Ebola virus in West Africa is unprecedented in its scale. But while some media focus on experimental vaccines, health experts say we ought to be talking about fundamental inequities in basic healthcare delivery. We'll talk about ebola with Laurie Garrett, senior fellow for global health at the Council on Foreign Relations.
Also on the show: The largest environmental march ever brought hundreds of thousands into New York City streets, but the People's Climate Watch was mostly ignored by the media. As was its companion action, Flood Wall Street, which targeted corporations behind climate instability with civil disobedience. Is the people's voice on climate change being ignored by the corporate media just as it's been ignored by corporate backed governments? We'll speak with Anne Petermann, director of the Global Justice Ecology Project, and the Climate-Connections blog.