Search Results for: Josmar Trujillo, <i>Extra!</i>

Oct
21
2014

If Censorship is Good Enough for NPR...

Why is Mumia Abu-Jamal's voice so frightening? The Pennsylvania death-row inmate, convicted in 1982 of murdering Philadelphia police office Daniel Faulkner in a trial marred by procedural violations and gross judicial prejudice, has been the target of an unprecedented campaign to prevent him from speaking to the public. When National Public Radio commissioned Abu-Jamal to do a series of commentaries in 1994, the Philadelphia Fraternal Order of Police lashed out--as did the likes of Sen. Robert Dole (R-Kansas), who said the plans to broadcast Abu-Jamal's words showed NPR's need for "closer oversight by the Congress" (Current, 5/23/94). In the face of pressure, […]

Oct
21
2014

Mumia Abu-jamal

Mumia Abu-jamal
Oct
21
2014

If Censorship is Good Enough for NPR...

Why is Mumia Abu-Jamal's voice so frightening? The Pennsylvania death-row inmate, convicted in 1982 of murdering Philadelphia police office Daniel Faulkner in a trial marred by procedural violations and gross judicial prejudice, has been the target of an unprecedented campaign to prevent him from speaking to the public. When National Public Radio commissioned Abu-Jamal to do a series of commentaries in 1994, the Philadelphia Fraternal Order of Police lashed out--as did the likes of Sen. Robert Dole (R-Kansas), who said the plans to broadcast Abu-Jamal's words showed NPR's need for "closer oversight by the Congress" (Current, 5/23/94). In the face of pressure, […]

Oct
21
2014

If Censorship is Good Enough for NPR...

Why is Mumia Abu-Jamal's voice so frightening? The Pennsylvania death-row inmate, convicted in 1982 of murdering Philadelphia police office Daniel Faulkner in a trial marred by procedural violations and gross judicial prejudice, has been the target of an unprecedented campaign to prevent him from speaking to the public. When National Public Radio commissioned Abu-Jamal to do a series of commentaries in 1994, the Philadelphia Fraternal Order of Police lashed out--as did the likes of Sen. Robert Dole (R-Kansas), who said the plans to broadcast Abu-Jamal's words showed NPR's need for "closer oversight by the Congress" (Current, 5/23/94). In the face of pressure, […]

Oct
21
2014

If Censorship is Good Enough for NPR...

Why is Mumia Abu-Jamal's voice so frightening? The Pennsylvania death-row inmate, convicted in 1982 of murdering Philadelphia police office Daniel Faulkner in a trial marred by procedural violations and gross judicial prejudice, has been the target of an unprecedented campaign to prevent him from speaking to the public. When National Public Radio commissioned Abu-Jamal to do a series of commentaries in 1994, the Philadelphia Fraternal Order of Police lashed out--as did the likes of Sen. Robert Dole (R-Kansas), who said the plans to broadcast Abu-Jamal's words showed NPR's need for "closer oversight by the Congress" (Current, 5/23/94). In the face of pressure, […]

Oct
21
2014

The Washington Post: The Establishment's Paper

Don't get too far from the establishment. --Walter Lippmann to Katharine Graham File Lippmann's remark under the category of superfluous advice. Graham and the company of which she is "chairman"--she lists herself in the D.C. phone book as "Graham, Philip L. Mrs."--have never entertained a thought of straying from the establishment. In 1933, when Graham's father, Eugene Meyer took control of the bankrupt Washington Post, it enjoyed only physical closeness to power. The paper badly needed the wealth and connections that Meyer had in spades: Over the years, he'd been a Wall Street banker, director of President Wilson's War Finance […]

Oct
21
2014

The Washington Post: The Establishment's Paper

Don't get too far from the establishment. --Walter Lippmann to Katharine Graham File Lippmann's remark under the category of superfluous advice. Graham and the company of which she is "chairman"--she lists herself in the D.C. phone book as "Graham, Philip L. Mrs."--have never entertained a thought of straying from the establishment. In 1933, when Graham's father, Eugene Meyer took control of the bankrupt Washington Post, it enjoyed only physical closeness to power. The paper badly needed the wealth and connections that Meyer had in spades: Over the years, he'd been a Wall Street banker, director of President Wilson's War Finance […]

Oct
21
2014

Katharine Graham

"We live in a dirty and dangerous world. There are some things the general public does not need to know and shouldn't. I believe democracy flourishes when the government can take legitimate steps to keep its secrets and when the press can decide whether to print what it knows." --Katharine Graham addressing senior CIA employees at Agency headquarters in November 1988 (Regardie's magazine, Jan. 90)

"We live in a dirty and dangerous world. There are some things the general public does not need to know and shouldn't. I believe democracy flourishes when the government can take legitimate steps to keep its secrets and when the press can decide whether to print what it knows." --Katharine Graham addressing senior CIA employees at Agency headquarters in November 1988 (Regardie's magazine, Jan. 90)