Oct 09 2015

Phyllis Bennis on US Bombing of Afghan Hospital

Kunduz hospital

The hospital attack is not the first of its kind, nor—if we take the advice of generals that the incident means the US should increase its military presence in the country—will it likely be the last. After 14 years of war on Afghanistan, what has the US achieved?

Oct 06 2015

NYT Continues to Obscure Responsibility in US’s Bombing of Hospital


Will any high-ranking official in the United States face repercussions over the hospital slaughter? It seems unlikely, given how the New York Times and other US outlets have diffused responsibility for the atrocity.

Oct 05 2015

Media Are Blamed as US Bombing of Afghan Hospital Is Covered Up


Ambiguous, misleading and even downright dishonest language abounds throughout the coverage of the US bombing of an Afghan hospital.

Nov 07 2014

Roberto Lovato on Mexico, Ann Jones on Afghanistan


This week on CounterSpin: The disappearance of 48 student activists in Mexico has brought hundreds of thousands of activists to the streets, demanding accountability from the US-allied president who just months ago was being cheered by Time magazine as the man who would save Mexico. We’ll talk to journalist Roberto Lovato about the crisis in Mexico and the reasons the story isn’t getting enough coverage in the US press.

Also this week: US media presented the election of Ashraf Ghani as Afghanistan’s president as good news, largely because he would sign an agreement allowing US forces to remain in the country. Afghan women had different reasons to be tentatively hopeful; but then, who remembers Afghan women? We’ll talk with journalist Ann Jones about her new article, The Missing Women of Afghanistan.

Aug 21 2014

NYT Responds on Torture

Public editor sees FAIR's point on Amnesty report


New York Times public editor Margaret Sullivan responded to a FAIR Action Alert by saying that she agreed coverage of an Amnesty International report about US torture in Afghanistan “would have benefited Times readers.”

Apr 11 2014

Phyllis Bennis on Afghan Elections, Alfie Kohn on The Myth of the Spoiled Child


CBS told viewers the recent presidential election in Afghanistan was a major victory for the US military. The idea that 12 years of war and occupation have gifted that country with peace and stability is shaping up as the line of the day in US media. Phyllis Bennis of the Institute for Policy Studies has a different take.

And author Alfie Kohn talks about his new provocative new book, “The Myth of the Spoiled Child,” which argues that much of the conventional wisdom about children and parenting is just wrong.

May 10 2013

Peter Hart on Syria and Sarin, Dilip Hiro on Afghan Corruption


Peter Hart talks about Syria and chemical weapons claims, and author Dilip Hiro joins the show to talk about how stories about Afghan corruption fail to explain the U.S. role in creating that corruption.

Nov 01 2012


Extra! November 2012

Don’t Look to NYT  to ‘Litigate’ the Facts Margaret Sullivan, the new New York Times public editor (9/16/12), used the topic of “voter fraud” to illustrate the concept of “false balance”―when two sides are treated as equivalent even when one side has reality on its side. Despite Republican efforts to pass laws to prevent voting by the ineligible, research finds next to no examples of this problem―but coverage often treats the absence of fraudulent voting as a partisan assertion (Extra!, 10/12). While Sullivan rightly observed that “journalists need to make every effort to get beyond the spin and help readers […]