Jan
01
1994

Women ARE the News

In 1990, the executive editor of the New York Times responded to a critical study of his paper by saying, in effect, that when women were making the news, they would be in it. But women are making news daily. Usually, they are the news, yet Frankel and his colleagues, as Jane O'Reilly would say, still "don't get it." When young women organize against rape and claim their right to sex on their own terms, Newsweek calls it "Sexual Correctness," and asks, "Have We Gone Too Far?" When Antioch College supported a student initiative to promote consent-seeking rather than blame-assigning […]

Jan
01
1994

A FAIR Forum on Coverage of Women's Stories

From Heidi of Hollywood to Lenora Bobbitt, from the raped daughters of Bosnia to the starving mothers of Somalia—the most frequent role for women in the mainstream news are sadly familiar. "Women are more likely to get into the mainstream media as the victim of crime than in any other role," Helen Benedict, author of Virgin or Vamp: How the Press Covers Sex Crimes, told the audience at a Nov. 10 panel discussion or­ganized by the Women's Desk at FAIR. The panel posed the question: "Whose Story Is It Anyway? How the Media Tell Women's Stories." In com­mercial media fixated […]

Jan
01
1994

A Nuclear Conflict of Interest?

20/20 Blurs the Lines

Victor Neufeld runs 20/20, the second-most popular TV news magazine in U.S. media. Neufeld has been a top executive of 20/20 for 14 years—for the last seven, its executive producer with the final say on what the average 14 million viewers of the ABC news magazine get to see every Friday night. After 60 Minutes, 20/20 is the longest-running and most successful news magazine on the air. The environment is an important issue with the U.S. public. Since Neufeld took over 20/20 in February 1987, few environmental segments have aired (averaging less than five a year), and these have included […]

Jan
01
1994

Women ARE the News

From the Women's Desk:

In 1990, the executive editor of the New York Times responded to a critical study of his paper by saying, in effect, that when women were making the news, they would be in it. But women are making news daily. Usually, they are the news, yet Frankel and his colleagues, as Jane O'Reilly would say, still "don't get it." When young women organize against rape and claim their right to sex on their own terms, Newsweek calls it "Sexual Correctness," and asks, "Have We Gone Too Far?" When Antioch College supported a student initiative to promote consent-seeking rather than blame-assigning […]

Jan
01
1994

When 'Both Sides' Aren't Enough

The Restricted Debate Over Healthcare Reform

Journalists pride themselves on presenting "both sides" of a story. But if establishment media can decide which positions get to take part in debate, then telling "both sides" may be a way of keeping news consumers on the outside. Coverage of the health care reform debate provides a wealth of examples. Major news outlets go out of their way to avoid mentioning the progressive alternative to the Clinton health care program: a Canadian-style single-payer reform, which would replace private insurance with tax-financed comprehensive universal coverage. Hillary vs. Insurers In November, major media focused on the White House-promoted story of "Hillary […]

Jan
01
1994

Are All Yeltsin Critics 'Hard-Line' -- Or Is That Just the U.S. Media's Party Line?

When the Russian crisis began, CBS anchor Dan Rather suggested (9/21/93) that Boris Yeltsin "didn't go far enough" in getting rid of the "hard-liners." But how does a president legally get rid of elected members of parliament? President Yeltsin did it by simply dissolving parliament on Sept. 21, a blatantly unconstitutional move that won immediate support from the Clinton administration -- and immediate excuses from most U.S. media. A New York Times editorial (9/22/93) referred to Yeltsin's dissolution of parliament as "a Democrat's Coup." With the Clinton White House backing Yeltsin's every move, including ultimately the assault on Russia's "White […]