Apr
12
2013

Laura Flanders on Margaret Thatcher, Pardiss Kebriaei on Guantanamo

guant-hunger

Margaret Thatcher's death brought a wave of gushing coverage of the former prime minister-- but journalist Laura Flanders remembers a different Thatcher legacy; she'll join us to talk about it. And detainees at Guantanamo have engaged in a life-threatening hunger strike for months. We’ll talk about the effort to shed light on it with Pardiss Kebriaei, senior staff attorney at the Center for Constitutional Rights.

Jan
01
2004

A Little Help From Media Friends

While conservative pundits frequently charged that the L.A. Times' expose was motivated by partisanship, the LA Weekly's Hollywood reporter, Nikki Finke (9/12/03), was one of the few to draw attention to the fact that right-wing radio was explicitly campaigning to recall incumbent Democrat Gray Davis. The websites of Disney's KABC-AM in L.A. and its KSFO-AM in San Francisco both had "countdown clocks" ticking out the projected end to "California's Gray Days." Salem communications' Sacramento AM promoted itself as "the Home of the Recall," reported Finke. Claiming that they feared an avalanche of ads from all 135 candidates in the race, […]

Nov
01
2002

"Why Is Dissent Not Fit for Coverage?"

CounterSpin interview with talkshow host Laura Flanders

CounterSpin: Mainstream U.S. media love dissent. They love to report about it and editorialize in favor of it--when it happens in places like China or Cuba. The Washington Post and the New York Times have even endorsed armed dissent, editorializing in the 1980s in favor of aid to rebel armies. But when dissent comes home, there can be a gaping double standard. The attitude of journalists to dissent at home seems to be: We have freedom to dissent, so hey, you protestors, shut up! Speaking of dissent, Laura Flanders joins us now to talk about coverage (or non-coverage) of recent […]

Sep
01
2002

Scuttling a Debate With Scandal

Harmful to Minors controversy a missed opportunity

Judith Levine is a Brooklyn-based journalist with a long history of writing about sexu­ality and gender. When her most recent book came out this year, she hoped, as all authors hope, that her work might provoke some useful debate. Harmful to Minors: The Perils of Protecting Children From Sex (Minnesota University Press) is a scholarly text, full of footnoted research into the history and con­temporary effect of U.S. laws and attitudes relating to sexuality. Age of consent laws, Levine notes, originat­ed to protect patriarchal property--a daughter's virginity; ghastly things keep happening to kids whose sexu­al curiosity is cast as pathological; […]

Jan
01
2002

It's Not Just the Veil

Media need to look deeper at women's role in Afghanistan

There was a moment in the war against Afghanistan when the Bush administration appeared to care about nothing so much as women's liberation. Out came first lady Laura Bush to talk to the nation about the matter. On November 16, she became what her publicists cheered was "the first first lady to deliver an entire presi­dential radio address" when she denounced the "severe repression against women of Afghanistan." Laura Bush's speech was coordi­nated with the release of a State Department report that condemned conditions for women and children under the Taliban and the Al Qaeda terror network. "The fight against […]

Sep
01
2001

Will British Libel Laws Rule Cyberspace?

Bush-backing mining co. muzzle's reporter's website

British libel law is called that, you'd think, because it applies in Britain. When it comes to libel, the U.K. is about the most plain­tiff-friendly country in the world. British citizens enjoy no guaranteed freedom to write, to speak, let alone to publish. It's a free speech-free zone. But U.S. citizens escaped all that when they hammered out the First Amendment, right? It may be time to think again. A Canadian firm has managed to use British law to shut down part of a U.S.-based website. The suit, which pit­ted Barrick Gold and Goldstrike Mines against Guardian Newspapers UK, was […]

Jan
01
1998

Forgotten Behind Bars

Abuse of women in prison doesn't "set off" media

When the Supreme Court upheld a judge's decision to cut by more than half the suggested prison sentences of the police officers who beat Rodney King (to 30 months), there was no media outcry calling the justices, or the public, "soft" on cops who commit crimes. Yet when a Cambridge judge decided to let Louise Woodward go free on time served, the same media that had blanketed the nation with emotive reporting on the British au pear lashed back at the public. "There's just something about a woman behind bars that sets people off," suggested Laura Mansnerus in a front-page […]

Sep
01
1997

Life Without Father

Feminists' exclusion skews debate on dads

In July, the anti-feminist Independent Women's Forum scored a double win worthy of the Women's National Basketball Association: IWF representatives published op-ed articles in the New York Times (7/10/97) and the Wall Street Journal (7/11/97) on consecutive days with the very same message. And the message was repeated a third time on CBS Evening News (7/13/97), where Laura Ingraham, an IWF founder, has a regular soapbox slot to "comment," unchallenged, on the news. (Ingraham is now misleadingly identified by the New York Times as a "news analyst." CBS tags her as a "commentator," airing no feminist to "comment" back.) The […]