Mar
14
2014

Miguel Tinker Salas on Venezuela, Ali Abunimah on Palestine

CNN-Venezuela

This week on CounterSpin: Venezuela's violent demonstrations, which began a month ago, have begun to wind down. Has anything been resolved between the largely middle and upper class opposition, and the democratically elected government they want to leave? We'll talk with Pomona College professor and the author of The Enduring Legacy: Oil, Culture and Society in Venezuela, Miguel Tinker Salas.

Also this week: The news from Israel-Palestine is usually quite bleak, and this week is no different. But are the Palestinians winning? That's what Ali Abunimah argues in his new book The Battle for Justice in Palestine. He'll join us to explain.

Apr
01
2013

In Death as in Life, Chavez Target of Media Scorn

His independence, help for Venezuela's poor will not be forgiven

Venezuela’s left-wing populist President Hugo Chávez died on Tuesday, March 5, after a two-year battle with cancer. If world leaders were judged by the sheer volume of corporate media vitriol and misinformation about their policies, Chávez would be in a class of his own. Shortly after Chávez won his first election in 1998, the U.S. government deemed him a threat to U.S. interests—an image U.S. media eagerly played up. When a coup engineered by Venezuelan business and media elites removed Chávez from power, many leading U.S outlets praised the move (Extra!, 6/02). The New York Times (4/13/02), calling it a […]

Mar
08
2013

Mark Weisbrot on Hugo Chavez, Kevin Gosztola on Bradley Manning

manning

This week on CounterSpin: Venezuelan leader Hugo Chavez is dead but his independence and help for Venezuela's poor remains unforgiven in the US press. We'll talk to Mark Weisbrot of the Center for Economic and Policy Research about what media's portrayal of Chavez says about media.

Also on the show: Bradley Manning's trial took a dramatic turn when he explained, in great detail, the reasons why he uploaded thousands of sensitive files to the website WikiLeaks. His goal was to spark public debate about U.S. war and foreign policy. Kevin Gosztola has been covering the trial for firedoglake.com he'll join us to talk about Manning's statement, and about the implications the trial has for press freedom.

Mar
01
2013

SoundBites March 2013

Extra! March 2013

FireShot Screen Capture #042 - 'FAIR TV_ Obama's Liberal Inaugural_, Anonymous Iran Truth-Telling, PBS Drone Conflict' - www_fair_org_blog_2013_01_25_fair-tv-obamas-liberal-inaugural-anonymous-iran-truth-telling-

If It Weren’t for Those Meddling Iranians “This demonstrates the ever pernicious Iranian meddling in other countries in the region.” —unnamed U.S. official complaining to Reuters (1/28/13) about Iran allegedly sending arms to Yemen, where the U.S. is conducting a secret drone war   Extreme Weather, Unexplained NBC Nightly News (1/13/13) asked a serious question, then offered an unserious answer. Anchor Lester Holt remarked: “Strange winter: Why it is so cold where it should be warm, and so warm where it should be cold. What is going on with all this extreme weather?” Correspondent Kristen Dahlgren turned to the Weather […]

Dec
01
2012

Democracy & Double Standards

U.S. coverage of Venezuelan and Georgian elections

"President Mikheil Saakashvili at a rally on Friday in Tbilisi. Parliamentary elections are Monday"

Amnesty International (10/1/12) describes it as a nation where ruling party officials have “abused public institutions and administrative re-sources to restrict the freedom of assembly, expression and association of opposition supporters,” many of whom have been “fined, fired, harassed or detained.” Free speech advocates condemned its president for shuttering an opposition TV station for alleged complicity in a coup plot, right before its 2008 elections. The region’s leading election monitor found those elections plagued by violence, intimidation and ballot box-stuffing. Its president has been criticized for changing the law to sidestep term limits and remain in power. Venezuela? No—U.S. ally […]

Oct
12
2012

Josh Eidelson on Wal-Mart strike; Keane Bhatt on Venezuela vote

Photo: OUR Walmart

Workers at Wal-Mart walked off the job this week and that is business far from usual at the retail giant. Reporter Josh Eidelson explains why it’s a game-changer. And U.S. media were rooting against Venezuelan president Hugo Chavez. Journalist and activist Keane Bhatt will tell us about the worst of the coverage.

Apr
01
2007

Hyping the Venezuela Threat

To NYT, ‘arms spending’ doesn't mean spending on arms

A report in the New York Times on Venezuela’s international arms purchases (“Venezuela Spending on Arms Soars to World’s Top Ranks,” 2/25/07) used selective information and an alarmist tone to suggest that Venezuela’s military spending was a potential threat to regional stability. Reporter Simon Romero’s story began: Venezuela’s arms spending has climbed to more than $4 billion in the past two years, transforming the nation into Latin America’s largest weapons buyer and placing it ahead of other major purchasers in international arms markets like Pakistan and Iran. By putting Venezuela in the company of Pakistan and Iran—whose military programs have […]

Dec
01
2006

The Repeatedly Re-Elected Autocrat

Painting Chávez as a 'would-be dictator'

Hugo Chávez never had a chance with the U.S. press. Shortly after his first electoral victory in 1998, New York Times Latin America reporter Larry Rohter (12/20/98) summed up his victory thusly: All across Latin America, presidents and party leaders are looking over their shoulders. With his landslide victory in Venezuela’s presidential election on December 6, Hugo Chávez has revived an all-too-familiar specter that the region’s ruling elite thought they had safely interred: that of the populist demagogue, the authoritarian man on horseback known as the caudillo. Notwithstanding that interring caudillos has not been a consuming passion of Latin America’s […]